Homosexuality is Not a Civil Right by Peter Sprigg

Early in 2004, San Francisco mayor Gavin Newsom began giving out marriage licenses—illegally—to same-sex couples. One of the homosexuals who traveled to San Francisco in search of a marriage license explained his rationale succinctly: “I am tired of sitting at the back of the bus.”1

The allusion, of course, was to the famous story of Rosa Parks. Parks is the African-American woman who, one day in 1955, boarded a racially segregated city bus in Montgomery, Alabama, sat down near the front, and refused the driver’s order to “move to the back of the bus.” Parks’ act of civil disobedience violated one of the “Jim Crow” laws that enforced racial segregation in various public services and accommodations in some states.

Parks’ arrest for her courageous defiance sparked the Montgomery bus boycott, led by a young minister named Martin Luther King, Jr., which is generally viewed as the beginning of the great civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. It culminated legislatively in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, banning racial discrimination in employment, housing, and public accommodations.

The stories of Rosa Parks and Martin Luther King, Jr. have become an inspiring part of American history. It’s not surprising that homosexual activists have tried to hitch their caboose to the “civil rights” train. They do this in the context of efforts to change the definition of marriage in order to allow same sex “marriages” (by comparing same-sex “marriage” to interracial marriage) and efforts to pass “hate crime” laws (which stigmatize opposition to homosexual behavior as a form of “hate” comparable to racism). The arguments in this essay are relevant to those debates, but focus particularly on laws that would ban employment “discrimination” on the basis of “sexual orientation” (such as the federal Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which is regularly introduced each Congress).

This essay is not a legal treatise, but an exploration of the philosophical justification for including various characteristics as categories of protection under historic civil rights laws—and why “sexual orientation” simply does not compare with them.

Defining Terms: What Are “Civil Rights,” Anyway? …

Read the rest of the article here:
“Homosexuality is Not a Civil Right” by Peter Sprigg, Senior Fellow for Policy Studies at the Family Research Council

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Charlton Heston’s Faith: Was He A Christian? (Plus – Heston’s Harvard Speech, 1999)

I noticed that my dashboard showed a lot of search terms like, “was Charlton Heston a Christian”, and actually so far today ALL the search terms have had some variation of this question… “It’s a good question,” I told myself. So, not really knowing if he was or not, I decided to do a search of my own.

Aside from the astounding fact that he stayed married to his wife, Lydia, for 64 years (a miraculous feat in and of itself in a place like Hollywood) I found many very interesting items about this great man that you may not know…

Such as apparently George Clooney thought it was perfectly okay to mock Heston’s revelation that he had Alzheimer’s disease.

Michael Moore (that fine, upstanding individual), who’s propaganda film (or should I say docu-dramamine) “Bowling for Columbine” featured an interview with Heston that attempted to challenge his stance on the Second Amendment… remember, Mr. Heston was already suffering from Alzheimer’s – but he seemed pretty lucid to me. Mr. Moore apparently is a card carrying member if the NRA. (I guess I should run right out and join NARAL…) **

Unlike some candidates running for president this election cycle, Mr. Heston actually DID march with Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr…

Charlton Heston at 1963 March on Washington (NARA/USIA)
Charlton Heston At 1963 March On Washington (Public Domain: (NARA/USIA) Photo File Under Creative Commons License)

He also openly organized boycotts of Hollywood eateries that refused to serve blacks. Here is an interesting post. A very generous obituary from an activist blog that I normally wouldn’t frequent:
A Peaceniks view of Charlton Heston’s Activism.

And of course, there is this now-famous speech he made at Harvard in 1999…

Winning the Cultural War
Charlton Heston’s Speech to the Harvard Law School Forum
Feb 16, 1999
I remember my son when he was five, explaining to his kindergarten class what his father did for a living. “My Daddy,” he said, “pretends to be people.” There have been quite a few of them. Prophets from the Old and New Testaments, a couple of Christian saints, generals of various nationalities and different centuries, several kings, three American presidents, a French cardinal and two geniuses, including Michelangelo.

If you want the ceiling repainted I’ll do my best. There always seem to be a lot of different fellows up here. I’m never sure which one of them gets to talk. Right now, I guess I’m the guy.

As I pondered our visit tonight it struck me: If my Creator gave me the gift to connect you with the hearts and minds of those great men, then I want to use that same gift now to reconnect you with your own sense of liberty of your own freedom of thought … your own compass for what is right.

Dedicating the memorial at Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln said of America, “We are now engaged in a great Civil War, testing whether this nation or any nation so conceived and so dedicated can long endure.” Those words are true again. I believe that we are again engaged in a great civil war, a cultural war that’s about to hijack your birthright to think and say what resides in your heart. I fear you no longer trust the pulsing lifeblood of liberty inside you … the stuff that made this country rise from wilderness into the miracle that it is…

Read the rest of the speech HERE.

Was Charlton Heston a Christian? I don’t know. But if he was as humble about his own activism and it’s impact on society as I estimate that he was, perhaps he also chose to keep the extent of his religious affections (or lack thereof) under his hunting hat.

We will miss him.

(Here is a link to the AP story about Heston’s funeral written by Bob Thomas, who apparently was informed by family members that Heston was indeed a devoutly religious man.

Another unique look at Heston can be found at Pilgrim’s Planet.

This information was added to this post on April 13th, 2008.)

Be sure to visit the Reformed Faith Weblog Home Page for devotionals, news and commentary.

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** NOTE: The Bowling for Columbine interview may require you to sign in to verify that you are over 18 years of age.**

Martin Luther King, Jr. – Remembering His Legacy After 40 Years Without Him

Martin Luther King, Jr. - March on Washington Speech

On this date forty years ago, Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis, Tennessee at the Lorraine Hotel as he stood outside on the landing. He had been helping to organize the sanitation workers there to help them improve their lot. They were some of the poorest workers in the city, and MLK’s heart was to help those who were oppressed.

For this he was killed. He saw the status quo as being something that needed to be changed – peacefully with persistence, but in the end, changed for the betterment of all people no matter their race or background. Would that more people would take up worthy causes with this spirit in mind.

Take a moment today to honor his memory and to use your own talents and gifts to change the world for the good of all. And with Love.

Read the top story for the day here:
Marchers Remember Dr. King

Also learn more about the history of the civil rights movement and MLK’s role in it here:
The King Center

And now a little something that not many people know about him here:
Why Martin Luther King was a Republican.